Future Case

Crossmedia, Social, Mobile, Business Modeling, Marketing, Research and insights

Posts Tagged ‘Social network

leave a comment »

The other day I was challenged to do a pitcha kuchi, twenty slide, each slide on for twenty seconds; the entire presentation taking exactly 6 minutes and forty seconds. Taking Wellman, Marin, Wilson and Ronald Burt as my main resources (with a tiny bit of Sloterdijk), I tried to explain what SNA, Social Network Analysis, is all about. Here are the pictures and the texts.

1

1. Marin and Wellman say that the starting point of social network analysis is that social life is created by relationship and patterns formed in these relations in which a social network is a set of nodes – say members – that are tied by relations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

2. Network analysts take these networks as the primary building blocks of the social world, they not only collect unique types of data, they begin their analyses from a fundamentally different perspective than that adopted by individualist or attribute-based social science.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3. A social network is a set of socially-relevant nodes connected by one or more relations. Nodes, or network members, are the units that are connected by the relations. It is the patterns of these relations we study.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slide 4

4. Behavior of network members creates particular outcomes. We are all different but share similar behavior when we act in certain groups. So by studying networks we can explain these macro-level behavioral patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slide 5

5. Remember the recent discussion? What is a group, a community, a social network? Michelle Wilson has her own educated thoughts that deal with the positioning of nodes, individuals, their networks and agency, the ability to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Do what? I would say, relate. Social network analysts study patterns of relations, not just relations between pairs of nodes. It is really about the effects of the interaction between nodes, clusters and beyond. I see it as constructions of foam bubbles; amorphous unity.

6. Do what? I would say, relate. Social network analysts study patterns of relations, not just relations between pairs of nodes. It is really about the effects of the interaction between nodes, clusters and beyond. I see it as constructions of foam bubbles; amorphous unity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Social network analysis has become an interdisciplinary area of study and is a thriving research area. Network analysts mainly use two perspective to develop theory: Formalism and Structuralism.

7. Social network analysis has become an interdisciplinary area of study and is a thriving research area. Network analysts mainly use two perspective to develop theory: Formalism and Structuralism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Formalist theories are primarily concerned with describing the mathematical form of social networks. These theories study the effects of forms, insofar as they are effects on the form itself, and the causes of these forms, insofar as they are structural.

8. Formalist theories are primarily concerned with describing the mathematical form of social networks. These theories study the effects of forms, insofar as they are effects on the form itself, and the causes of these forms, insofar as they are structural.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Structuralist theories are concerned with how patterns of relations can shed light on substantive topics within their disciplines. Interpretation is like analyzing a football match: from a to b to c to a to d to e etcetera; it is a fluid structure.

9. Structuralist theories are concerned with how patterns of relations can shed light on substantive topics within their disciplines. Interpretation is like analyzing a football match: from a to b to c to a to d to e etcetera; it is a fluid structure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. In any case, the question is whether SNA  provides answers to questions like: should relations within and between classes matter, should relations between organizations matter, and do health-related and -influencing relations matter?

10. In any case, the question is whether SNA provides answers to questions like: should relations within and between classes matter, should relations between organizations matter, and do health-related and -influencing relations matter?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11. Some researchers ask what kinds of social networks lead to particular outcomes. These outcomes may include finding a job, a promotion, catching a cold, or what have we. They are Looking at network causes of phenomenon of interest.

11. Some researchers ask what kinds of social networks lead to particular outcomes. These outcomes may include finding a job, a promotion, catching a cold, or what have we. They are Looking at network causes of phenomenon of interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. Others study the effects of particular network properties and positions and the causes of networks and positions like how social interaction shapes social networks, for instance within-neighborhood relations are more likely to form between neighbors who have access to electronic means of communicating with each other.

12. Others study the effects of particular network properties and positions and the causes of networks and positions like how social interaction shapes social networks, for instance within-neighborhood relations are more likely to form between neighbors who have access to electronic means of communicating with each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13. Okay. After collection, network data are used to calculate properties of network positions. Properties are things like the number of relations a node has and how clusters of nodes in a network are bridged. This is what for instance network researcher Ronald Burt calls network anatomy.

13. Okay. After collection, network data are used to calculate properties of network positions. Properties are things like the number of relations a node has and how clusters of nodes in a network are bridged. This is what for instance network researcher Ronald Burt calls network anatomy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14. The social network anatomy is a way to explain networks. If you delineate a network, connectors and nodes have meaning that can be explained. Connected nodes are groups of networked individuals who relate; have relationships with other members.

14. The social network anatomy is a way to explain networks. If you delineate a network, connectors and nodes have meaning that can be explained. Connected nodes are groups of networked individuals who relate; have relationships with other members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15. Closure is about developing strong ties, trust, reputation and community within clusters. Trust-builders are able to understand the deep connections that bond people and give the cluster members a common identity.

15. Closure is about developing strong ties, trust, reputation and community within clusters. Trust-builders are able to understand the deep connections that bond people and give the cluster members a common identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16. Betweenness indicates the degree to which a node forms a bridge or critical link between other nodes. For instance, some people – nodes – serve as gatekeeper to others or, some serve as gateway to dissimilate information to others: hubs.

16. Betweenness indicates the degree to which a node forms a bridge or critical link between other nodes. For instance, some people – nodes – serve as gatekeeper to others or, some serve as gateway to dissimilate information to others: hubs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17. Closeness is a measure of how easily a node can connect with other nodes. You may approach some people in your network, say at the university, very easily but others may be hard to reach perhaps because of betweenness problems. The question rises if interaction is easier with nodes that are directly linked to you or those further away.

17. Closeness is a measure of how easily a node can connect with other nodes. You may approach some people in your network, say at the university, very easily but others may be hard to reach perhaps because of betweenness problems. The question rises if interaction is easier with nodes that are directly linked to you or those further away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18. Degree is the number of connections a node has to other nodes. For example, the number of people in your family, or on your team at work or the number of friends you have on Facebook.

18. Degree is the number of connections a node has to other nodes. For example, the number of people in your family, or on your team at work or the number of friends you have on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19. Brokerage is about developing weak ties: building bridges and relationships between clusters of nodes. Brokers are in a position to see the differences between groups, cross-pollinate ideas and develop the differences into new ideas and opportunities.

19. Brokerage is about developing weak ties: building bridges and relationships between clusters of nodes. Brokers are in a position to see the differences between groups, cross-pollinate ideas and develop the differences into new ideas and opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20. To wrap up. Marin & Wellman say that social network analysis is a paradigm that starts off with the premise that social life is created primarily by relations and the patterns they form. What do you say? Check out this website: www.insna.org

20. To wrap up. Marin & Wellman say that social network analysis is a paradigm that starts off with the premise that social life is created primarily by relations and the patterns they form. What do you say? Check out this website: http://www.insna.org

Written by Kees Winkel

December 14, 2012 at 10:08

Posted in 1

Tagged with , , , , ,

Social Network Giant Facebook Now Delivers Streaming Movie Rentals from Miramax | Mobile Marketing Watch

leave a comment »

Big news in the world of social networking today thanks to a collaboration between Facebook and cable giant Miramax.

This week, Miramax officially joins the likes of Warner Bros., Paramount and Universal by being the latest provider of streaming video rentals through Facebook.

For now, the modest service offers twenty titles available for immediate viewing via rental.

Facebook users, who can access the viewing portal directly through the social networking site (no download required), will be charged 30 Facebook credits per movie (roughly $3). Rentals expire 48 hours after a user has started viewing the rented film.

Films now available for rental through The Miramax eXperience include:

Adventureland

Chicago

Clerks

Cold Mountain

From Dusk Till Dawn

Extract

Gangs of New York

Gone Baby Gone

Good Will Hunting

Jackie Brown

Kill Bill

Kill Bill 2

No Country for Old Men

Pulp Fiction

Shall We Dance

Sin City

Spy Kids

Swingers

The Switch

Trainspotting

via Social Network Giant Facebook Now Delivers Streaming Movie Rentals from Miramax | Mobile Marketing Watch.

Written by Kees Winkel

August 23, 2011 at 16:02

Posted in 1

Tagged with , , ,

Ambition #1 for 2008: Developing Roget’s 3D ontology

with 4 comments

The other day I was walking our dog in the second Weteringplantsoen, the small park close to where I live in Amsterdam. Probably due to my reflective mindset at Christmas time, I thought back twenty five years ago, just a month before my mom died. Somehow, I remembered that I had borrowed her Roget’s International Thesaurus, third edition, printed and published by Collins (London and Glasgow) in 1974. I’ve used the book ever since to improve the quality of my writing in English. Of course, nowadays I use thesauruses online but as it is, I like to use old fashion books as well. Anyway, I started to think about thesauruses and the probable complex work people put in them. Then I got an idea, combining different and apparently not associated information (thesauruses, ontologies, art, 3D, Borges’ Labyrinth and probably a lot more). And that is the origins of my first ambition for the next year: I am going to develop a 3D ontology based on Roget’s Thesaurus. And this is how I want to do it and how I imagine it (of course my process will be based on my book, using the Enneagraphical system). 

I will pick at random one word from Roget’s, put it in a Visio sheet (mind mapping tool) and put the synonyms around them. Then I will take each of the synonyms and do the same. My guess is that with around 250.000 words in the book – thus being an ending list – I will need a lot of 2D space. Meantime I will ask people if they have a clue of how to get this landscape of words (wordscape[1]) into a 3D setting as I assume that there will be overlap in certain words (with more than one homological meanings).Later on, my ambition will grow because I want to build a real 3D ontology and put it in a place for people to see.Even further in time, I would like the 3D ontology to grow in an emergent way by monitoring English written sites globally, measuring the frequency of use of words, ranking those words and developing a tool to automatically rearrange the 3D ontology. 

So, what’s the purpose? You tell me! There is something lingering in my brain that tells me to do this. It could give us visual insight in complexities (not just languages but also (social) networks and emergence, I guess). Perhaps you have some clues to help me out or even adopt parts of this project?


[1] See the page ‘Credits’ for the credits of this word

Written by Kees Winkel

December 30, 2007 at 13:05

Posted in 1

Tagged with , , , , ,

Social network penetration a PDF

with 2 comments

I use this PDF when lecturing about social networks and modern marketing approaches. You are free to use it as well or comment on it. I only ask you to send me a quick email.
The slide show is about how fast a marketer can penetrate into a network by only addressing 2% of the nodes, the so called hubs (see posting ‘Brand to community by using hubs in social networks). The graphs about the penetration were done by a researcher of the Helsinki University of Technology, a couple of years ago. I’m sorry to say that I forgot his name. The experiment was a laboratory set up, using 150 nodes (as seems to be a key amount of notes in a SN). I’m hoping to prove that this is right in my research about mentality approach which will start early January 2008. Enjoy. Social Networks 

Written by Kees Winkel

December 8, 2007 at 11:48

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , , ,

%d bloggers like this: